CONSUMPTION OF BAY LEAF (A FOOD SPICE) MAY BE A SAFE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR MALE INFERTILITY RESULTING FROM PARTIAL LIGATION OF THE LEFT RENAL VEIN IN WISTAR RAT: STUDY SUGGEST

AKUNNA, G.G. and Saalu, Linus C. and Ogunlade, B. and OJEWALE, A.O. and Enye, L.A. (2013) CONSUMPTION OF BAY LEAF (A FOOD SPICE) MAY BE A SAFE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR MALE INFERTILITY RESULTING FROM PARTIAL LIGATION OF THE LEFT RENAL VEIN IN WISTAR RAT: STUDY SUGGEST. American Journal of Research Communication, 1 (3). pp. 123-142.

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Abstract

Approximately 10% of all men have varicoceles. Oxidative stress has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Varicocelectomy is not an effective treatment in such cases as it failed to restore fertility after surgery in many patients. Bay leafs are spices used in cooking due to their flavoring capacity and aroma. This study aimed to elucidate the histological and spermiographic changes after left experimental varicocele and to evaluate the possible protective role of bay leaf extract. A total of 20 adult male wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (A, B, C and D) with 5 rats in each group. The rats in group A served as the control, Group B and C hard a partial ligation of their left renal vein. Group D rats underwent a similar procedure, but varicocele was not induced (sham). Rats in group B in addition had orally treatment with 60 mg/kg of Bay leaf extract daily for 10 weeks after varicocele induction. The animals were sacrificed 10 weeks post operation and histological, sperm parameters and oxidative enzymes where evaluated. Result showed that the testes of varicocelized models treated with bay leaf extract an improved sperm characteristics and morphology when compared to the untreated varicocelized rats. Supplementation with bay leaf extract in cases of infertility with varicocele may have a protective effect.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Varicocele, Infertility, Bay leaf, Oxidative Stress, Sperm count, Histomorphometry
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences > School of Medicine
Depositing User: Mr Tayo Okunlola
Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2016 14:06
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2016 14:06
URI: http://eprints.abuad.edu.ng/id/eprint/900

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